Aerial view of pipeline construction in Greene County.  ©    Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Aerial view of pipeline construction in Greene County. ©  Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Aerial view of Marcellus Well site and impoundment in Greene County.  ©    Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Aerial view of Marcellus Well site and impoundment in Greene County. ©  Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Pipe used in natural-gas drilling and a worker at Consol Energy's NV-31D rig in Morris Township, Washington County.  ©    Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Pipe used in natural-gas drilling and a worker at Consol Energy's NV-31D rig in Morris Township, Washington County. ©  Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Horizontal rig manager Vince Black at Consol Energy's NV-41 rig in S. Franklin Township in Washington County.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Horizontal rig manager Vince Black at Consol Energy's NV-41 rig in S. Franklin Township in Washington County. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Workers departing the NV-41 rig.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Workers departing the NV-41 rig. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Volunteers take a break at the Oil and Gas Safety Supply booth at the Tri-County Oil & Gas Expo in the Washington County Fairgrounds. Oil & Gas Safety Supply sells affordable flame-resistant work wear. Amy Savage opened the store in Washington, PA and it's one of the growing number of women-owned businesses serving the gas, oil, and coal industry.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Volunteers take a break at the Oil and Gas Safety Supply booth at the Tri-County Oil & Gas Expo in the Washington County Fairgrounds. Oil & Gas Safety Supply sells affordable flame-resistant work wear. Amy Savage opened the store in Washington, PA and it's one of the growing number of women-owned businesses serving the gas, oil, and coal industry. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Well flaring in Jefferson Township, Greene County. Flaring is done to test well performance and can last anywhere from one to several days.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Well flaring in Jefferson Township, Greene County. Flaring is done to test well performance and can last anywhere from one to several days. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Well flaring just before dawn in Jefferson Township,  Greene County.  Flaring is done to test well performance and can last anywhere from one to several days.  ©  
  
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  Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Well flaring just before dawn in Jefferson Township,  Greene County.  Flaring is done to test well performance and can last anywhere from one to several days.  © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Jeanne Williams and her husband Llew purchased the 113-acre farm they named Red Barn Farm in 1995. Her father introduced her to farming in her teens when her family moved to Greene County. Auzre, one of Williams' barn cats, explores the land overlooking pipeline construction. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Jeanne Williams and her husband Llew purchased the 113-acre farm they named Red Barn Farm in 1995. Her father introduced her to farming in her teens when her family moved to Greene County. Auzre, one of Williams' barn cats, explores the land overlooking pipeline construction. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Williams watches her border collie Maggie monitor livestock in December. Work began on the natural-gas pipeline at the Freeport Township farm in Greene County in November 2011. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Williams watches her border collie Maggie monitor livestock in December. Work began on the natural-gas pipeline at the Freeport Township farm in Greene County in November 2011. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Jeanne Williams drags Tulip, a reluctant goat about to give birth, into a shed for closer monitoring. Tulip later gave birth to triplets. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Jeanne Williams drags Tulip, a reluctant goat about to give birth, into a shed for closer monitoring. Tulip later gave birth to triplets. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 A large truck rumbles by the Williams' farm. Dust is another problem for landowners because of increased truck traffic on rural roads.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

A large truck rumbles by the Williams' farm. Dust is another problem for landowners because of increased truck traffic on rural roads. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

© Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 A landowner in Greene County warns industry trucks to stay off his property.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

A landowner in Greene County warns industry trucks to stay off his property. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 A landowner observes a freshwater impoundment built by EQT near the edge of his farm in Greene County.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

A landowner observes a freshwater impoundment built by EQT near the edge of his farm in Greene County. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 A truck hauling heavy equipment for the natural gas industry slows traffic along Route 188 in Jefferson Township, Greene County.  © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

A truck hauling heavy equipment for the natural gas industry slows traffic along Route 188 in Jefferson Township, Greene County.  © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Marcellus Shale well in Tiadaghton State Forest in Lycoming County. The state made close to $400 million in gas-drilling leases over a four-year period, mainly in places like Tiadaghton State Forest.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Marcellus Shale well in Tiadaghton State Forest in Lycoming County. The state made close to $400 million in gas-drilling leases over a four-year period, mainly in places like Tiadaghton State Forest. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Marcellus Shale well with impoundments in the Tiadaghton State Forest in Lycoming County. Pennsylvania could lose upwards of 90,000 acres of forest to Marcellus drilling in the next twenty years.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Marcellus Shale well with impoundments in the Tiadaghton State Forest in Lycoming County. Pennsylvania could lose upwards of 90,000 acres of forest to Marcellus drilling in the next twenty years. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Ken Dufalla collects a water sample while monitoring bromide levels at Clyde Mine discharge along Ten Mile Creek in Greene County. In fresh water, elevated levels of bromide, a substance usually found in seawater, are always a result of human activity. Dufalla is president of the Harry Enstrom Chapter of Izaak Walton League in Greene County and a long time advocate for clean water. As of March 2012, high bromide concentrations- some contend as a result of Marcellus Shale activity- remained a concern in many of the region's rivers.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Ken Dufalla collects a water sample while monitoring bromide levels at Clyde Mine discharge along Ten Mile Creek in Greene County. In fresh water, elevated levels of bromide, a substance usually found in seawater, are always a result of human activity. Dufalla is president of the Harry Enstrom Chapter of Izaak Walton League in Greene County and a long time advocate for clean water. As of March 2012, high bromide concentrations- some contend as a result of Marcellus Shale activity- remained a concern in many of the region's rivers. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

 Aerial view of pipeline construction in Greene County.  ©    Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 Aerial view of Marcellus Well site and impoundment in Greene County.  ©    Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 Pipe used in natural-gas drilling and a worker at Consol Energy's NV-31D rig in Morris Township, Washington County.  ©    Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 Horizontal rig manager Vince Black at Consol Energy's NV-41 rig in S. Franklin Township in Washington County.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 Workers departing the NV-41 rig.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 Volunteers take a break at the Oil and Gas Safety Supply booth at the Tri-County Oil & Gas Expo in the Washington County Fairgrounds. Oil & Gas Safety Supply sells affordable flame-resistant work wear. Amy Savage opened the store in Washington, PA and it's one of the growing number of women-owned businesses serving the gas, oil, and coal industry.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 Well flaring in Jefferson Township, Greene County. Flaring is done to test well performance and can last anywhere from one to several days.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 Well flaring just before dawn in Jefferson Township,  Greene County.  Flaring is done to test well performance and can last anywhere from one to several days.  ©  
  
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  Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 Jeanne Williams and her husband Llew purchased the 113-acre farm they named Red Barn Farm in 1995. Her father introduced her to farming in her teens when her family moved to Greene County. Auzre, one of Williams' barn cats, explores the land overlooking pipeline construction. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 Williams watches her border collie Maggie monitor livestock in December. Work began on the natural-gas pipeline at the Freeport Township farm in Greene County in November 2011. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 Jeanne Williams drags Tulip, a reluctant goat about to give birth, into a shed for closer monitoring. Tulip later gave birth to triplets. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 A large truck rumbles by the Williams' farm. Dust is another problem for landowners because of increased truck traffic on rural roads.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 A landowner in Greene County warns industry trucks to stay off his property.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 A landowner observes a freshwater impoundment built by EQT near the edge of his farm in Greene County.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 A truck hauling heavy equipment for the natural gas industry slows traffic along Route 188 in Jefferson Township, Greene County.  © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 Marcellus Shale well in Tiadaghton State Forest in Lycoming County. The state made close to $400 million in gas-drilling leases over a four-year period, mainly in places like Tiadaghton State Forest.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 Marcellus Shale well with impoundments in the Tiadaghton State Forest in Lycoming County. Pennsylvania could lose upwards of 90,000 acres of forest to Marcellus drilling in the next twenty years.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012
 Ken Dufalla collects a water sample while monitoring bromide levels at Clyde Mine discharge along Ten Mile Creek in Greene County. In fresh water, elevated levels of bromide, a substance usually found in seawater, are always a result of human activity. Dufalla is president of the Harry Enstrom Chapter of Izaak Walton League in Greene County and a long time advocate for clean water. As of March 2012, high bromide concentrations- some contend as a result of Marcellus Shale activity- remained a concern in many of the region's rivers.  ©   Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Aerial view of pipeline construction in Greene County. ©  Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Aerial view of Marcellus Well site and impoundment in Greene County. ©  Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Pipe used in natural-gas drilling and a worker at Consol Energy's NV-31D rig in Morris Township, Washington County. ©  Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Horizontal rig manager Vince Black at Consol Energy's NV-41 rig in S. Franklin Township in Washington County. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Workers departing the NV-41 rig. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Volunteers take a break at the Oil and Gas Safety Supply booth at the Tri-County Oil & Gas Expo in the Washington County Fairgrounds. Oil & Gas Safety Supply sells affordable flame-resistant work wear. Amy Savage opened the store in Washington, PA and it's one of the growing number of women-owned businesses serving the gas, oil, and coal industry. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Well flaring in Jefferson Township, Greene County. Flaring is done to test well performance and can last anywhere from one to several days. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Well flaring just before dawn in Jefferson Township,  Greene County.  Flaring is done to test well performance and can last anywhere from one to several days.  © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Jeanne Williams and her husband Llew purchased the 113-acre farm they named Red Barn Farm in 1995. Her father introduced her to farming in her teens when her family moved to Greene County. Auzre, one of Williams' barn cats, explores the land overlooking pipeline construction. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Williams watches her border collie Maggie monitor livestock in December. Work began on the natural-gas pipeline at the Freeport Township farm in Greene County in November 2011. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Jeanne Williams drags Tulip, a reluctant goat about to give birth, into a shed for closer monitoring. Tulip later gave birth to triplets. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

A large truck rumbles by the Williams' farm. Dust is another problem for landowners because of increased truck traffic on rural roads. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

© Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

A landowner in Greene County warns industry trucks to stay off his property. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

A landowner observes a freshwater impoundment built by EQT near the edge of his farm in Greene County. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

A truck hauling heavy equipment for the natural gas industry slows traffic along Route 188 in Jefferson Township, Greene County.  © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Marcellus Shale well in Tiadaghton State Forest in Lycoming County. The state made close to $400 million in gas-drilling leases over a four-year period, mainly in places like Tiadaghton State Forest. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Marcellus Shale well with impoundments in the Tiadaghton State Forest in Lycoming County. Pennsylvania could lose upwards of 90,000 acres of forest to Marcellus drilling in the next twenty years. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

Ken Dufalla collects a water sample while monitoring bromide levels at Clyde Mine discharge along Ten Mile Creek in Greene County. In fresh water, elevated levels of bromide, a substance usually found in seawater, are always a result of human activity. Dufalla is president of the Harry Enstrom Chapter of Izaak Walton League in Greene County and a long time advocate for clean water. As of March 2012, high bromide concentrations- some contend as a result of Marcellus Shale activity- remained a concern in many of the region's rivers. © Martha Rial/MSDP 2012

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